Bart Smith Photography

​Walking Down a Dream

​Old Spanish Trail

  1. Managing Director
    Palace of the Governors, Santa Fe Plaza, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
  2. Managing Director
    Camel Rock, a famous balanced rock and namesake of Camel Rock Casino just north of Tesuque Pueblo, New Mexico.
  3. Managing Director
    Hills near Camel Rock, Tesuque Indian Reservation, New Mexico. (Evening)
  4. Managing Director
    Seeking, searching for Knowing. Espanola, New Mexico.
  5. Managing Director
    Remnants of church Santa Rosa de Lima near Abiquiu, New Mexico.
  6. Managing Director
    Ghost ranch escarpment from HW 84, New Mexico.
  7. Managing Director
    Ghost ranch escarpment, New Mexico.
  8. Managing Director
    Ghost ranch escarpment, New Mexico.
  9. Managing Director
    Somewhere along HW 84, New Mexico.
  10. Managing Director
    Chimney Rock from HW 160 near Piedra, New Mexico.
  11. Managing Director
    This kind waitress stepped out of the Billy goat Saloon to offer me iced water and a decal. West of Bayfield, Co.
  12. Managing Director
    Artwork displayed beside HW 160 west of Mancos, Co.
  13. Managing Director
    La Sal Mountains framed old corral fence. Peters Canyon north of Monticello, Utah,
  14. Managing Director
    Wilson Arch from HW 191. Utah.
  15. Managing Director
    Camp along HW 191 north of Wilson Arch, Utah.
  16. Managing Director
    Old Spanish Trail Arena a few miles south of Moab, Utah.
  17. Managing Director
    Camp from near road 334 crossing Crescent Bench, Utah.
  18. Managing Director
    Zanu and Banu investigating badlands near Solitude Wash a few miles southwest of Green River, Utah.
  19. Managing Director
    Downtown Green River, Utah.
  20. Managing Director
    Sign designating the route of the Old Spanish Trail along Rd 1030 in Saleratus Wash, Utah.
  21. Managing Director
    Remnants of Smith Cabin Homestead. Not directly related to the Old Spanish Trail but utilized the same spring as the early travelers. Tidwell Draw, Utah.
  22. Managing Director
    Cottonwood tree that may have been a sapling when the Spanish traders travelled by. Cottonwood Wash, Utah.
  23. Managing Director
    View east of corridor where the Old Spanish Trails traversed from the base of the Cedar Mountains , San Rafael Swell, Utah.
  24. Managing Director
    Iron sculptures depicting travelers along the Old Spanish Trails crossing Buckhorn Flat south of the Cedar Mountains , San Rafael Swell, Utah.
  25. Managing Director
    Rock Canyon along Castle Valley a few miles south of Castle Dale, Utah.
  26. Managing Director
    Whimsical building in Salina, Utah.
  27. Managing Director
    A kind gift bag from a passerby near Monroe, Utah.
  28. Managing Director
    Lichen on boulder near Poverty Flat along Sevier River Valley, Utah.
  29. Managing Director
    Lichen on boulder near Poverty Flat along Sevier River Valley, Utah. A few days later I walked into Circleville Utah and stayed at the Circleville RV Park. A huge Thank You to the proprietors Glen and Tanja for all the kind hospitality.
  30. Managing Director
    The Old Spanish Trail skirted this rock formation along Bear Creek west of Bear Junction, Utah. Earlier in the day I walked with another fellow, Lubo Falcon, who was walking from Florida to San Fran. It is always heartening to share the trail with another wandering soul.
  31. Managing Director
    Original trace of the Old Spanish Trail descending through Little Creek Canyon, (near Forest Road 077), Dixie National Forest, Utah.
  32. Managing Director
    Glossy Snake, Escalante Valley, north of new Castle, Utah.
  33. Managing Director
    Sign designating the Old Spanish Trail near New Castle, Utah.
  34. Managing Director
    Horse in front of Veyo Volcano, a geologic landmark along the Old Spanish Trail, Veyo Utah.
  35. Managing Director
    Trace of the Old Spanish Trail westbound near Castle Cliffs. Joshua Tree Natural National Landmark, Utah.
  36. Managing Director
    Trace of the Old Spanish Trail eastbound approaching Castle Cliffs. Joshua Tree Natural National Landmark, Utah.
  37. Managing Director
    The Virgin River, very important water source along the Old Spanish trail, a few miles south of Mesquite, Nevada.
  38. Managing Director
    Horned Lizard beside the Old Spanish Trial in Halfway Wash, Nevada.
  39. Managing Director
    Trace of the Old Spanish Trail ascending Virginia Hill and Mormon Mesa. (The longest continuous trace along the entire route). Nevada.
  40. Managing Director
    Along Trace of the Old Spanish Trail ascending Virginia Hill and Mormon Mesa. (The longest continuous trace along the entire route). Nevada.
  41. Managing Director
    Trace of the Old Spanish Trail ascending Virginia Hill and Mormon Mesa. Nevada.
  42. Managing Director
    Trace of the Old Spanish Trail descending Virginia Hill and Mormon Mesa heading towards Halfway Wash. Nevada.
  43. Managing Director
    Along the Old Spanish Trail across the Mormon Mesa, Nevada.
  44. Managing Director
    Camp along the Old Spanish trail at the intersection of HW 93 and I 15, 20 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Nevada.
  45. Managing Director
    Beehive Hill, a landmark along the Old Spanish Trail, from I-80 near Wiser Wash. Nevada
  46. Managing Director
    Houses in desert, northwest Las Vega, Nevada.
  47. Managing Director
    H2O, Las Vegas Wash, Las Vegas, Nevada.
  48. Managing Director
    Old Las Vegas Mormon Historic Fort, Nevada.
  49. Managing Director
    Sculpture, Las Vegas. Nevada.
  50. Managing Director
    $75.00 Motel room, Las Vegas, Nevada. (It was the 5th motel I visited and it was getting dark)
  51. Managing Director
    Las Vegas, Nevada.
  52. Managing Director
    Dad and daughters riding the streets of Vegas, Nevada.
  53. Managing Director
    What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas.... unless you post it.
  54. Managing Director
    Old Moulin Rouge Casino location, Las Vegas, Nevada.
  55. Managing Director
    Oil on canvas, painted by Frederick S. Dellebaugh from a sketch made at Los Vegas Rancho in 1876. This image is a photograph from a kiosk at Las Vegas Springs Preserve, Las Vegas.
  56. Managing Director
    Remains of a ranch building at the springs which were an important water source along the Old Spanish Trail and namesake of the future city of Las Vegas, Las Vegas Springs Preserve, Las Vegas. Nevada.
  57. Managing Director
    Lush growth still flourishes at Las Vegas Springs although the water level is much lower than when the Old Spanish Trail existed, Springs Preserve, Las Vegas. The skyline of Las Vegas can be seen in the distance. Las Vegas was an oasis along the Old Spanish Trail. Nevada.
  58. Managing Director
    On the corner of Rainbow and Prism, Las Vegas.
  59. Managing Director
    Burgeoning community on western edge of Las Vegas. Nevada.
  60. Managing Director
    On the edge of wishful thinking, Las Vegas. Nevada.
  61. Managing Director
    Residential community on western edge of Las Vegas. Nevada.
  62. Managing Director
    Old Spanish Trail followed this wash southwest of Las Vegas leading towards the Blue Diamond Hills, Nevada.
  63. Managing Director
    Along the Old Spanish Trail west of Las Vegas and heading towards the Blue Diamond Hills, Nevada.
  64. Managing Director
    Original trace of the Old Spanish Trail a few miles west of Las Vegas and heading towards the Blue Diamond Hills, Nevada.
  65. Managing Director
    Rusted wagon nail on original trace of the Old Spanish Trail a few miles west of Las Vegas and heading towards the Blue Diamond Hills, Nevada.
  66. Managing Director
    The Old Spanish Trail heading towards Blue Diamond Mountain and the village of Blue Diamond. Nevada.
  67. Managing Director
    Old Spanish Trail viewed from a cave near Blue Diamond, Nevada.
  68. Managing Director
    Lights of Las Vegas from Blue Diamond Hills above the Old Spanish Trail, Cottonwood Valley, Nevada.
  69. Managing Director
    Sculpture memorializing the Old Spanish trail along HW 160 west of Las Vegas, the highway directly follows the historic route through Cottonwood Valley. Nevada.
  70. Managing Director
    Post designating the Old Spanish trail on putting green in front of Mountain Springs Saloon. Mountain Springs, Nevada. The springs were an important water source along the Old Spanish Trail.
  71. Managing Director
    Crossing Pahrump Valley, Nevada.
  72. Managing Director
    Original trace of the Old Spanish Trail descending eastbound from Emigrant Pass in the Nopah Range, California.
  73. Managing Director
    Cross on hill, Tecopa, California.
  74. Managing Director
    Rock wall at Resting Springs. One theory is this was a fortification dating to the 1860,s protecting the valuable water source from warring Indians. Resting Springs was a very important water source along the Old Spanish Trail through the Mojave Desert, Near Tecopa, California. (Today it is private Property and permission was granted)
  75. Managing Director
    Daybreak from camp along Death Valley rd, Silurian Valley, California.
  76. Managing Director
    11:47:57 AM at the Worlds largest thermometer, Baker, California with a long way to go.
  77. Managing Director
    3:44:36 PM Seeking shade under a Tamarisk Tree in the Mojave Desert southwest of Baker, California.
  78. Managing Director
    Abandoned store along Yerma Rd near Harvard, Mojave Desert, California.
  79. Managing Director
    Location along the Old Spanish Trail known as Forks of the Road, west of Yermo, California.
  80. Managing Director
    A freight and stage station known as Hawley Station existed on the Old Spanish Trail at about the same location as this now abandoned ranch house, an important location on the Old Spanish Trail in the Mojave Desert known as Forks of the Road, West of Yermo, California.
  81. Managing Director
    Mojave River Valley, California.
  82. Managing Director
    Route 66 parallels and directly follows sections of the Old Spanish Trail from the Mojave Valley all the way through Cajon Pass, California.
  83. Managing Director
    Daggett Pioneer Cemetery, Daggett, California. Some buried here were descents of Old Spanish Trail travelers.
  84. Managing Director
    Old Spanish Trail in Barstow, California.
  85. Managing Director
    Along Route 66, Mojave Valley, California.
  86. Managing Director
    Route 66 Sage Brush Inn Gas Station that offered 2 hr room rentals between Barstow and Victorville, California. (Kidding about the rentals, they were 1 hr)
  87. Managing Director
    Elmer's Bottle Tree Ranch, a famous stop along Route 66 between Barstow and Victorville, California.
  88. Managing Director
    Ever expanding development into Mojave Desert southwest of Victorville, California.
  89. Managing Director
    Original trace of the Old Spanish Trail (to the left) entering Cajon Canyon, California.
  90. Managing Director
    Like crossing paths with an old friend. Pacific Crest Trail, Cajon Canyon, California.
  91. Managing Director
    Monument at Sycamore Grove at western base of Cajon Canyon, Glen Helen Regional Park California. The Sycamore trees were the first large trees the travelers on the Old Spanish Trail would have seen since entering the Mojave Desert 300 miles prior.
  92. Managing Director
    San Gabriel Mission, Los Angeles California.
  93. Managing Director
    San Gabriel Mission, Los Angeles California.
  94. Managing Director
    San Gabriel Mission, Los Angeles California.
  95. Managing Director
    San Gabriel Mission, Los Angeles California. Western terminus of the Old Spanish Trail. (Bronze sculpture is of Fray Junipero Serra, Founder of the California Missions.)
  96. Managing Director
    Palm lined streets of Los Angeles, California.
  97. Managing Director
    Mural, Alhambra LA California.
  98. Managing Director
    Olvera Street, Los Angeles, Ca.
  99. Managing Director
    Myself upon "officially" completing my walk of the Main Route of the Old Spanish Trail from Governors Plaza in Santa Fe to Overa Street in downtown Los Angeles, California.

Summary of the Trail




2002 - Old Spanish NHT

Some of the most remote and barren landscapes of North America are crossed by the Old Spanish Trail.  This route followed a succession of Native American footpaths to form several mule-train trading paths beween Santa Fe and Los Angeles in the period between Mexican Independence and the Mexican American War (1821 -1848).  Slowly moving mule train caravans carried wool and woolen goods west in trade for horses.  It was not a settlers' route and was too rough for wheeled wagons - yet it enhanced trade across the country.  In addition, parts of the Trail saw Indian slave trade fueled by raids that took place in neighboring regions.  The aftermath of this slave trade was felt in Native communities for many years after the Trail fell into disuse. American explorers, such as John C. Fremont, used parts of it.  The National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management share administrative responsibilities and work cooperatively with the Old Spanish Trail Association to protect and interpret the Trail.

(See website for the Old Spanish Trail Association)